Currently viewing the tag: "Handmade"

Patternbank recently discovered the eye-catching and vibrant embellishments of Leeds based textile artist Jessica Grady. We wanted to find out more so we asked her about herself and what influences her designs and techniques.

I am a contemporary embroidery artist who works from my home studio just outside of Leeds, West Yorkshire. My colourful and highly tactile work has been exhibited in various galleries and publications across the UK and Europe and I am also a member of the Crafts Council’s Makers directory. Recently I have been awarded the 2018 Embroiderers Guild Scholar award.

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Patternbank recently discovered the work of Amsterdam based artist Preta Wolzak. We asked her to share some information about herself and her latest projects. Wolzak studied Monumental Design at the Gerrit Rietveldacademie from 1986-1991. Since then she has worked on commission in applied arts: she has made illustrations for book covers, designed and made furniture, designed exhibitions, designed interiors for private people and companies. Since 2008 she has been making jewellery under the name Fortblink, and in 2013 she opened her creative store Old Fort On Dun on Oudeschans in Amsterdam. These images are from a selection of her recent collections Ma Petit Inuite, Everybody Needs A Hero and Arctic Charade, all of which share a common theme of the sometimes negative impact humans inflict on our planet causing pollution and the devastating effects of climate change. To see more and to read about her embroidery processes and the inspiration behind her work, visit Preta’s website here.

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Patternbank love the work of Australian sculptor Shona Wilson so we contacted her to find out more about her craft. A contemporary Australian sculptor, Shona engages with natural found material to create both abstract and representational, 2-D assemblages and 3-D sculptures. For over 25yrs, Shona has exhibited commercially. More recently she has also been involved with exhibiting science/art collaborations and Ephemeral Art making and facilitating workshops (from preschools to adults). Shona is the creator of the One A Day Ephemeral Art Project, which has inspired people worldwide.

“How can we care for what we do not know? My ongoing engagement with Nature’s fragments and invisible realms brings me closer to understanding the world we share. The materials themselves are storehouses of knowledge and information. They act as ‘keys’, unlocking doors to memory, science, history, imagination and Spirit.The intersects between nature, science, spirit, and art are potent environments to research and play within creatively. Art making can become Ceremony.  My work is an invitation to marvel and wonder at the details within nature which I have presented predominantly through sculptural assemblages. The mirroring of the micro/macro world and its phenomenology captivates me.

See more of Shona’s ephemeral projects here.

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Patternbank love the intricate work of artist and collector Kate Kato, we got in touch to discover more about her work process and what inspires her to create these beautiful paper and fabric sculptures. Kate lives in the Welsh boarders just outside the small town of Ross on Wye, where her natural environment inspires her daily.

Can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you work?

Using recycled paper, fabric and wire I try to capture the delicate detail and beauty of nature. Influenced by plants, insects and found objects, I create intricate, life-sized sculptures and arrange them into collections and dioramas. I have always been fascinated by the natural world and for me my work is very nostalgic, taking me back to my childhood and the curiosity that fuelled my creativity. My work aims to encourage curiosity and promote an awareness of the environment. I want to bring the small, hidden and overlooked details into the public eye and encourage people to consider their importance.

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Patternbank are loving the work of Husmann/Tschaeni (Michael Husmann Tschaeni & Mira Tschaeni)- an artist couple that are based in Switzerland and both studied at the College of Art in Lucerne. They have exhibited between New Delhi, Los Angeles and Melbourne. They work backward, painting in layers on the reverse of acrylic glass, using different materials, such as enamel, oil colour, watercolour, crayon, glitter, and spray. It is like if two completely different, somewhat incompatible picture languages collided when they started working together. But somehow they manage to create pictures, stories, and installations together, without having to change their own individual styles. Enjoy more of their work here & on their Instagram.

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